Kitchen Sink Series, Part 1: The Difference Between Undermount, Drop In, Dual Mount, and Apron Front Sinks

Kitchen Sink Series, Part 1: The Difference Between Undermount, Drop In, Dual Mount, and Apron Front Sinks   

You need a new sink, I get it.

The old one just isn't working out anymore.

There's not enough room, its scratched or stained, it just doesn't match the "look" of the kitchen you dream about....

it's time to say goodbye.

Now you have started down a path where the options feel endless and you need a little guidance.

You are not alone, which is exactly why we decided to do a series on sinks! 

 Selecting the best sink for you kitchen: the difference between undermount, drop in, dual mount, and apron front sinks

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Today we are talking about the difference between undermount, drop in, dual mount, and apron front.

Stay with me, I make it easy! 

  • Undermount Sinks

Undermount sinks are exactly what they sound like, they are mounted under the countertop.

They are really popular because they look sleek and modern and make cleaning a breeze because you can wipe directly into the sink, no edge!

The top edge of the countertop around the sink is exposed to the water so you will need to have a countertop material that is water resistant.

It is best with granite and quartz countertops as the water won't damage it.

You should also keep in mind that there may be a slightly higher cost for your countertops because the edge around the sink will need to be polished for a finished look. 

  • Drop In Sinks 

You can remember drop in sinks because a hole is cut in the countertop and the sink is essentially dropped in to the space.

They have an edge that is wider than the sink itself and molded down toward the countertop all the way around the perimeter.

These sinks are a perfect choice for those of you with laminate countertops.

The design will keep water away from any exposed edges that could get damaged.

With a drop in sink, your faucet will be installed directly into the sink ledge along the back of the sink.

You will want to make sure to pay attention to the number of holes in the sink to make sure it will match your choice of faucet. 



  • Dual Mount Sinks

For those of who who struggle to decide which of the previous options sounds better,

I give you the dual mount sink.

It has dual options: 

can be installed as either an undermount or a drop in!

It has a flat, sleek edge that will lay tightly around the countertop when installed as a drop in

OR that same flat edge can attach to the underside of the countertop for an undermount installation.

This is a great compromise if you want a flatter edge than is typical in drop in sinks,

or if you haven't yet selected a countertop type but MUST buy your sink.

It keeps your options open!

  • Apron Front Sinks

Apron front sinks (also know as farmhouse sinks)

got their name because much like your grandma would wear an apron to keep her clothes clean while cooking,

this sink has an apron to protect your cabinetry.

The front of the sink is made to hang over and out past the cabinetry, thus keeping the cabinets from being damaged with water that might splash out of the sink.

It seems that even more than its functionality,

apron front sinks have been really popular for the style it adds to your kitchen.

They come in both undermount and drop in installation types so you can choose to pair it with any type of countertop that suits your fancy. 

Conclusion

Which option so far seems like the best fit for you: drop in, undermount, dual mount, or apron front? 

Now that you know the differences between each of those, we can move on to talking about single basin vs. double basin sinks!